October 13, 2009

A Pure White, English Style Groundcover Rose


One of my favorite 'English' roses is actually a French rose. Meidiland White is a creation of the House of Meilland in France (obviously our US spelling of the rose's name is creative or just incorrect), but it has an old-fashioned character that fits in well with all my English David Austin roses.


I didn't purchase this rose; it was given to my by gardener friend Sandy. I often think of her when I admire the blooms, and that makes them even prettier. One thing I like about these roses is how well they hold up in a vase. The petals are thicker than those of most Austin roses, which makes them sturdier for cutting.


With a height of less than 2 feet and a spread of 3 to 5 feet, all depending on pruning, this rose is classified as a groundcover rose. The gorgeous dark green foliage makes a pretty groundcover even when the rose isn't in bloom. As you can see above, the new leaves have a bronze-maroon color before darkening to pure green.


The big drawback to this rose is its susceptibility to blackspot. If you have a big blackspot problem and don't spray, then this rose isn't for you. In areas with less severe blackspot problems (like my garden in California), the rose only needs a spray or two each season to stay healthy. It does have good resistance to rust, as it was planted near my rust-magnet Abraham Darby rose in California, and Meidiland White's leaves never had more than a small smattering of rust while Abraham turned entirely orange.


In drier climates like mine, Meidiland White performs beautifully and looks nice near the front of the border. Above you can see the nice backdrop created by its dark leaves; the purple delphinium really stands out in contrast. The rose takes a little break from blooming after it's heavy first flush, then puts out a smattering of blooms through the rest of the season. It only gets partial sun in my garden and would more profusely in full sun with regular deadheading and plenty of nutrients and water.


In the cold temperatures of fall, Meidiland White blooms take on a touch of pink near the base, but they are usually pristine white. With those dark glossy leaves and elegant blooms, this rose is a beauty and a keeper for my garden.

17 comments:

  1. What a beautiful white rose. I think plants that have been given to us by others make them that much more special.

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  2. I just recently planted a couple easy to take care of roses, and they will have to thrive without sprays. I sure love your white blooms there!

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  3. I was with you until the blackspot issue. Sounded like the perfect rose up until that. It is a beautiful bloom.

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  4. This is a very pretty one, I hadn't heard of it before. I've been lucky with roses this year, up until the last week I hadn't seen any sign of blackspot on anything. The flower really does look nice against those dark green leaves.

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  5. What a gorgeous rose, with containers it is harder for me to grow roses, they have difficulty surviving through the winter, but this beauty makes me want to try again.

    You mentioned the double click cosmo in your comment on my blog. I really don't know which variety it is. The garden centre where I work had some Livingston seeds, [from Holland, and they were 2 for 1. I originally thought I was taking a chance on purchasing them. But everything I bought is amazing, now I wish that I had gotten more of everything. The germination was terrific.

    Jen

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  6. I love seeing the carpet of roses these produce. They work in Toronto (not in my dry shade garden, of course) as long as the setting is bright and sunny with excellent air circulation.

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  7. Those white roses are so lovely and all of them are in bunches.
    It must be wonderful to take cuttings and place them inside to admire their beauty and fragrance.
    Lovely..

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  8. I do like white roses. In fact I really should grow more.

    Your Meidiland White looks really beautiful. It's the kind of rose I can imagine growing behind and spreading over a low wall. Bet it looks great in the evening light.

    Needless to say I bump into a good few Meilland roses over in this neck of the woods.

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  9. Hi VW~~ I can see your attraction to this lovely rose. That it holds up in a vase is a definite plus with so many of David's collection falling into complete disarray in a matter of a day if I'm lucky. Your California rust issue sounds pretty bad. I've got a couple of roses riddled with powdery mildew this year but nary a blackspot or rust blister to be seen. Having a rose that looks good within a mixed border is important these days, don't you think? The ubquitous hybrid teas don't hold a candle. My 'Double Delight' is hiding behind a lilac. I love the blossoms but not the plant.

    Coupled with the vibrant Delphinium, delightful!

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  10. Your roses are to die for, VW! This one in particular with the form and low growth habit, easy to admire the flowers. Roses grow so well in California, and yours are so obviously well tended. :-)
    Frances

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  11. As always I get great plant ideas from your blog. My go-to white rose is usually Iceberg, but this sounds like a wonderful choice for a lower growing type. Rosa meidiland 'Bonica' is one of my favorite pink cultivars - long bloom season and reasonably trouble free - so am happy to learn about another meidiland cultivar.

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  12. it's really beautiful VW and I'll admire it from my desk! Blackspot would be all over it here. It's good to run across a rose whose leaves look good when they aren't blooming....I've a friend who must hear about this beauty. gail

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  13. You always inspire me to want to try roses. After my nice bout with powdery mildew this year I wasn't so sure. But here again today I am ready to dive into the catalogs!

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  14. hi VW, I adore old fashioned roses, so much more than new ones, and this French rose is heart-stoppingly (not literally thank goodness) beautiful.Cheers, catmint

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  15. White roses are looking so pretty!!!!

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  16. It is a beautiful rose...I wish we could grow roses like that in east Texas but it is too humid and I don't spray.
    I have two roses..a climber named Dawn and one old rose named Belinda's Dream...both do well in this climate, but I would love to have more.

    Have a wonderful day!!!

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