June 21, 2014

English Roses Blooming in All Shades of Pink


Eighteen different English roses have bloomed this month in the garden.  I caught pictures of all of them but will divide them into two posts since there are so many.  This week is all pink roses.  Above is Harlow Carr, which flowers profusely with medium-sized roses the color of bubble gum.


Gertrude Jekyll is a new addition this spring, so the roses aren't as full and large as they will be when the plant is established.  It's a very prickly rose but the fragrance is lovely.  I'm growing it as a climber since I have no more space for shrubs.


The Countryman is the same color as Gertrude and just as prickly - seems like I read that the two are closely related within David Austin's breeding program.  It has a wonderful strawberry fragrance.


Princess Alexandria of Kent starts out salmon-pink and matures to pure rose pink.  It has especially large flowers and is a favorite of mine.  I think it will mix especially well with Abraham Darby in a vase but haven't tried it yet.


Sister Elizabeth is growing like crazy this spring since I removed some competing plants.  Its musk fragrance reminds me of my grandmother's makeup.  You can see the adorable button eye at the center of the flower.


Charles Rennie Mackintosh lasts well in arrangements and blooms regularly, though not profusely.  It's growing much better since I added a drip line right to the base - roses can survive low water when established but they won't bloom or grow much without ample water.


The Lady's Blush is another new rose for me this year.  I wanted a different shape of rose for arrangements, and I especially like the bright gold stamens at the center.  I'm growing it as a climber.


This photo of Eglantyne shows a flower that has faded after a few days of being open in bright sunlight.  Eglantyne and The Lady's Blush are the same shade of pure light pink when they first open. 


Queen of Sweden is soft salmon-pink and produces very long, straight stems for an English rose.  It has very few thorns and lasts well in a vase.


I'll end with crimson-pink William Shakespeare 2000, which was one of my first English roses and is still a definite favorite.  If I could only grow one rose, this would be it.  The flowers are large and intricate, and the color is deliciously deep.  There is a medium old-rose fragrance, and it lasts well as a cut flower.  Next week I will post photos of the rest of my white, yellow and peach English roses.

13 comments:

  1. Stunning and charming! I'll be interested to know how the rose Gertrude Jekyll will grow as a climber! Very interesting and brave project!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tatyana - David Austin sells Gertrude Jekyll as a shrub and as a climber. Supposedly it does well in zones 4-8 and can reach 8-10 feet tall, though in Spokane it probably won't get that large. The thorns are yucky, though, so I'll be sure to wear gloves and long sleeves when pruning.

      Delete
  2. Wow! Beautiful roses! I have a small rose (bush?), though I have no idea what kind of rose it is. I did read that I could deadhead the roses and they would come back through summer/fall, so I am excited to try that. The rose bush was next to the driveway when we moved in (placed in a very weird location), so I dug it up and moved it and it seems to be thriving in its new location. You've inspired me to do more research about getting the roses to grow as climbers. : )

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi VW,

    Lovely roses; this year Harlow Carr is doing especially well for me. Gertrude Jekyll has again produced a lot of growth but is lacking in blooms. Susan Williams-Ellis isn't doing too well either unfortunately. I wonder if she didn't like all the rain early this year?? Although judging by what you said, they actually like a lot of watering.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I planted 7 more English roses this spring and can't wait for next year to see what they'll look like. Two of my favorites are Princess Alexandra of Kent and the Alnwick rose. With the exception of the Alnwick rose, I planted the hardiest roses I could get on their own root stock. Have you had any problems with winter kill with your English roses?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay for 7 more roses! How exciting. They take a few years to really get going for me, but in Moses Lake the growing season is longer each year so they'll mature faster. I don't think you'll have a problem with winter kill on any of your English roses. I also looked for hardiness in the description before buying, but I'm at least 1 zone colder than you. 'Litchfield Angel' died back to the ground one winter and I removed it because I didn't want to wait for it to grow from the base each year. With own-root roses you will avoid problems with rose viruses, which I have seen a couple of times on my roses. Now that David Austin sells so many on their own roots, I would recommend buying all their roses that way.

      Delete
  5. Your roses are gorgeous! I have a soft spot for David Austin roses, too. Our hot/humid climate makes it difficult to keep them healthy without using loads of chemicals so I only grow a few. But I wish I had as many as you. :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry you are so limited! There are a few advantages to our very cold, long winters - one of them being that we have fewer problems with pests and diseases.

      Delete
  6. These are gorgeous! I find myself adding a rose here or there every year, it seems. By the way, the little white miniature rose you gave me bloomed this week! It is lovely. And speaking of adding roses, it's making me want to find a couple more mini's to put in the front of my flowerbeds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linnae - the rose I gave you is Meidilland White and can grow 4-5 feet wide with time, though it stays around 1.5' tall for me. So give it plenty of room and you'll enjoy lots of blooms over the years!

      Delete
  7. Hello VW girl .. I think I lost my post .. hope I am not repeating myself?
    William Shakespeare was my first English rose as well ... and I love it! .. the scent is so wonderful, just like Zephirine Drouhin .. the Bourbons are such a wonderful group. I also wanted to say I found clematis "The President" and I am so happy ... I fell for it when I saw it on your blog here ... so happy to have tracked it down!
    Thanks !
    Joy
    PS ... I love all the PINKNESS !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joy - you'll love "The President'! I cut some flowers and used them in arrangements this year, and they lasted very well. That deep color is just gorgeous, isn't it?

      Delete
  8. WOW, I like them all. Very nice - especial like the share of Queen of Sweden. Great visiting today. JC

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for leaving a comment! I have comment moderation turned on to catch spam, so your comment will show up as soon as I can read and approve it.